Self Sufficient Steward

“Status Report” Mr. Green Jeans?

Yeah, I know. Cultural overload to channel Kirk and Kangaroo in the same sentence, but it fits the bill.

All crazy on the western front. Work is insanely busy, spring is a month early. We have two new ‘rescue’ dogs, and my wife is squeezing ten years worth of out-of-town travel into six months. I’ve also been looking at setting up a separate area for composting my garden waste. I’m thinking of a fairly efficient set up, possibly with one, maybe more compost tumblers. These simple devices help you toss the compost easily so that it ensures the pile gets evenly composted. I’ve been checking out a couple of websites as background work on which ones a the best to buy.

Anyway, busy times, so, any update is by necessity, a quick pictorial one. From this morning:

Some irises, with a hint or Knockout roses to come.

The ten foot long, high tunnel cold frame (now mostly open) was a huge success for greens through the winter and early spring, The true test? Whether shade cloth can make succession planting work through the summer….stay tuned.

A good spring for plums. The plum curlicos thought so too.

The good news? Tons of baby peachettes. The bad news? The same. So I’ll be removing most (down to one per six inches) so the young tree grows instead of the fruit, leaving enough to whet our appetite for a full grown tree.

Now HERE is the real deal. Midday on Saturday, this 600 square feet of dirt, was a two year-old chicken yard, with foot tall weeds and some seriously entrenched turf. After hours with a borrowed Troy-Bilt Horse and my Mantis tiller, and more hours on my knees with a shovel making the raised beds…..voila! Three dozen (so far) heirloom tomato varieties are comfy, after being raised from seed in the back room. They’re mostly planted about 16″ deep, so drought shouldn’t be an issue (given the water bottles).

Yeah, I buy liniment in bulk.

Credit: Best Rotating Compost Bin for Mixing your Garden Compost (GardenEaze)

Wallowin’ in Pollen

Crazy warm late winter here in central NC. It resulted in our fruit trees making it through without a late hard frost whackin’ the blossoms, as often happens. Below is a bit of video of the variety of pollinators busy on one of the plum trees. That clip merges in to another, showing what is really happening 24/7 this time of year, but hard to see when the sun is up. Tissue anyone?